Never Miss A Beat With Livestation

By Toby Coaker

If, in the age of 24 hour news channels and online media, you find it difficult to cram even more current affairs in to your schedule, think again.

While you might have used Livestation to stream live television over the Internet, perhaps you won’t have used its news video player.

It works in a similar way to the BBC’s iplayer. Yet Livestation aggregates all of the channels below (and more!) and allows you to watch each one – at the same time – on a multi-screen (see above):

Al Jazeera (English), BBC Arabic, BBC News, BBC Parliament, BBC World Service, Bloomberg Television, Channel 4, CNN International, CNBC Europe, euronews, France 24, ITV, RT (English), Sky News

The concept is simple – but it might just revolutionize the way we consume journalism.

Now it’s even easier than ever before to pick and choose between varying news providers – keeping an eye on all but listening to the one story you want to hear.

Such demanding news consumption has, up until now, only been accessible to those with multiple television screens or computer monitors. This is fairly rare beyond the walls of City University’s Journalism Department…

So for those savvy and concerned enough to use Livestation, it could mean the end of brand loyalty. Instead, we pick and choose what we want to engage with – an interview, a package, a two-way… The web is encouraging more competitive video journalism than ever.

There are other features too: Live chat allows you to share opinion with your community. If I was watching a compelling interview on Al Jazeera, for instance, I could encourage others to do the same.

The more impersonal but equally influential Twitter can also be used to quickly respond to changing events and broadcast titbits. Look below at how twitpic is used to rapidly inform others of what the news – and its providers – are doing:

If popular, Livestation will create the most hyper-responsive, critical, and discursive audience of video journalism ever. How should broadcasters react? Let us know.

What’s the Shorthand for ‘Video’?

By Ross Cullen

Trainee journalists are constantly reminded of the need to bridge the different media and be cross-platform reporters. But what of those who have already broken into the industry? How do they adapt?

Budding hacks are well aware of the importance of starting their career with established blogs, Twitter accounts and audio and visual editing skills, as well as the ability to write for online and printed media. They are not alone; the reporters ahead of them on the career path have also recognised that they have to change with the times. How are they doing it?

Staff at the Reading Post, in Berkshire, have turned their hands to online video journalism. Long gone are the days when a newspaper journalist only had to be a fast shorthander; now there is a need for video skills. The paper’s decision to launch a daily online video news bulletin illustrates a few different things:

1) An awareness that newsprint readership is diminishing and/or moving to the online versions of the publications. The editors need to hang onto their readers and interactivity is a great way of doing so.

2) The public love video. Citizen journalism is on the rise and, as previously discussed on this blog, broadcast media have already built whole pages on their online presences dedicated to video. Newspapers have to follow suit.

3) Time is of the essence. People are in a rush. Understanding that they might not have hours to sit down and read the paper cover-to-cover, the editors can still hold onto loyal readers as they visit the Post’s homepage by offering them quick, direct news in a free, 60-second video.

The Post uploads their daily video at lunchtime, giving online readers updated news during their midday breaks. As the media world changes around them, reporters need to be ahead of the game (and their competitors) in order to remain relevant and exciting. For a newspaper, enlisting the help of video on their webpages is a relatively easy and effective way of expanding their reach.

The margins of the different media are blurring. Local news services have to elbow and barge their way to the front of the public’s minds to continue to be noticed. The major TV channels tapped into video long ago. Online streaming is now clearly not solely the preserve of broadcasters.

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvPtzG-6Bzg&feature=player_embedded#

You Chose the News- Skynews.com TV

By Phil Georgiadis

The blurring boundaries between TV news and online journalism- a new phenomenon which has only taken off in the past year or so? Maybe not.

Between 2007 and 2010 Sky News aired a half hour long evening programme called ‘SkyNews.com’, presented by the brilliant Martin Stanford, which brought the web’s agenda onto our TV’s for the first time.

As the channel proudly proclaimed, it was a groundbreaking programme, which ‘set out to change the shape of television news by integrating the web and TV’. Sky and Stanford realised that web content worked well on TV, and also that streaming TV content online offered access to a wider audience.

It won a prestigious Royal Television Society gong in 2008 for innovation, with the judges praising it because “it lets the public rather than the news editor set the agenda.”

Well before it was the accepted norm for channels to stream their content live online it simulcast on TV and on the Web, and even offered exclusive content for web viewers while the main TV channel was off on advert breaks.

The show would track topics which were ‘trending’ across the web, and offer a rundown of the day’s viral videos, taken from sites such as Youtube. It also took a serious journalistic interest in the internet, and how it was increasingly shaping the news agenda.

It created a ‘user-generated agenda’ well ahead of its time, and is missed.

Take a look at the clips below to get an idea of how the show worked:

Log On to Latin America and Watch

By Ross Cullen

How do you explain the Latin American proficiency at using video as an online medium?

Gordon Brown and David Cameron have both tried to tap into YouTube as a way of engaging a new range of supporters. Yet it is only really around election time that there is any focus on their efforts.

The story is different in Latin America. Felipe Calderon, the Mexican president, has addressed the nation many times, most recently as a plea to bear with his policy towards the drugs gangs, and he knows that the televised content would be uploaded in video format online immediately.

After his televised addresses, the soap operas come back on and television audiences move on. But by not trying to stop his speeches appearing online in videos he ensures that the content is viewed many more times over an infinite time period. Online broadcasting is a free-flowing medium allowing users to engage with content as and when they want, without time restrictions.

Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelan premier, has fine-tuned this technique. He has a popular Twitter account (@chavezcandanga), just like Calderon (@FelipeCalderon). He has a regular television show ‘Alo Presidente’. His is an online, modern socialism that is developed through online media, particularly edited packages from television appearances published online in video format, through which he likes to grandstand and promote his bombastic, controversial diplomatic opinions. And he knows that this political theatre will be enshrined online.

At the other end of the continent, the Argentine president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner is another prolific exploiter of the video medium and Twitter user (@CFKArgentina). She knows that a speech delivered looking straight into the camera speaks directly to the online community and has her own YouTube account.

The Latin American politicians have recognised that there is constant global traffic online. They understand the transience of television and the breadth and openness of video content when it is viewed online. Viewers (and potential voters) do not have to tune in to a certain channel at a specified time to watch. They can view on the move; they can view 6 months later. They can also listen to the content and browse other websites while the content plays out.

The mobile and fast-growing market of Latin America welcomes forward-thinking developments with which it can engage. The politicians have seen this and adopted video online as a continuous and open platform to project their politics and they continue to adapt as the medium itself changes.

Source – Video One: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyQ_9AHpsr8&feature=relmfu

Source – Video Two: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnvsT5IymHA